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Special Issue: Addressing Gender Inequities in STEM through Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Published: 19-12-2022

Gender-Inclusive Instructional Practices in University Mathematics Classes

University of Groningen
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Oksana Kavatsyuk

Oksana Kavatsyuk is an assistant professor at the University College Groningen (University of Groningen), teaching various Physics and Mathematics courses. Currently, she and her team are exploring how all students regardless of their gender can be encouraged to explore their talents in mathematics to reach their full potential. Her research informs structural changes in the courses she teaches.

University of Groningen
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Maria Ioannou

Maria Ioannou is a social psychologist and she is currently employed as an assistant professor at the University College Groningen, University of Groningen. Her research interests lie in the area of intergroup relations and intergroup conflict. She is particularly interested in ways of reducing intergroup prejudice, stereotypes, and discrimination.  

University of Groningen
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Lucy Avraamidou

Lucy Avraamidou is professor of science education. Her research is associated with theoretical and empirical explorations of what it means to widen and diversify STEM participation in school and out-of-school settings through the lens of intersectionality. At the heart of the account of her work is an exploration of underrepresented groups' identity trajectories and negotiations with the use of narrative and life-history methods.

gender; STEM identity; educational practices; higher education; the Netherlands

Abstract

Women have been underrepresented in STEM fields around the world (UNESCO, 2018). Prior research identified some of the reasons for this gender disparity such as systemic barriers, lack of confidence, lack of female role models, and cultural and gendered science stereotypes. These issues have been framed in contemporary literature within the construct of STEM identity. Building upon this literature, our project explored the role of the university classroom in supporting the development of a strong STEM identity and specifically the view of self as a competent science person. The project consisted of two parts. In the first part student-led desktop and empirical research focused on generating evidence-based recommendations for how an introductory Calculus course could be redesigned to be more gender-inclusive. The second pertained to the evaluation of the redesigned Calculus course centered around two main indicators of success: (i) students’ confidence as mathematics learners, and (ii) their intention to continue with STEM education. The project has scientific and practical implications as it contributes evidence towards understanding the kinds of activities that might support university students’ STEM identity development and provides a set of concrete, evidence-based, gender-inclusive instructional practices.

How to Cite

Kavatsyuk, O., Ioannou, M., & Avraamidou, L. (2022). Gender-Inclusive Instructional Practices in University Mathematics Classes. International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology, 14(2), 280–295. Retrieved from https://genderandset.open.ac.uk/index.php/genderandset/article/view/1400