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Special Issue: Identifying Barriers and Building Bridges
Published: 27-12-2023

Traditional Gender Role Attitudes in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM): Are STEM Managers More Modern Than Others?

Otto-Friedrich-University Bamberg
Otto-Friedrich-University Bamberg
STEM traditional gender role attitudes panel study manager SOEP

Abstract

The lack of women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) careers is a multifaceted problem, and there may be various levers for change (e.g., managers’ attitudes). Whereas most previous studies have focused on educational aspects, we targeted later career stages: We measured managers’ gender role attitudes because managers can be a source of support or discrimination. In fact, women in STEM fields report less support and more discrimination than STEM men or non-STEM women do. Using a large and representative data set from the Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) in Germany, we compared traditional gender role attitudes in STEM versus non-STEM fields with ordered probit regressions and a multiverse analysis. We found that male, older, non-managerial, and non-STEM employees had more traditional gender role attitudes than others. Additionally, we found a gender gap: For men, older employees had more traditional gender role attitudes; for women, age did not matter, but female managers had less traditional gender role attitudes than non-managers. Reasons for this trend might be selection (e.g., women with traditional attitudes might abandon their careers earlier) or socialisation (e.g., female managers’ attitudes may change in male-dominated environments). Implications for women’s careers are discussed.

How to Cite

Stöcker, A.-K., & Schütz, A. (2023). Traditional Gender Role Attitudes in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM): Are STEM Managers More Modern Than Others?. International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology, 15(3), 328–349. Retrieved from https://genderandset.open.ac.uk/index.php/genderandset/article/view/1432